Interstellar

interstellarParamount/Warner Bros./Legendary (2014) 169 min. PG-13

Director: Christopher Nolan

Screenplay: Christopher Nolan & Jonathan Nolan

Cinematography: Hoyte van Hoytema; Editing: Lee Smith

Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Garry Fettis

Costumes: Mary Zophres; Score: Hans Zimmer

Stars: Matthew McConaughey (Cooper), Anne Hathaway (Amelia Brand), Jessica Chastain (Murphy), Michael Caine (Prof. Brand), Wes Bentley (Doyle), Matt Damon (Dr. Mann), Casey Affleck (Tom), MacKenzie Foy (young Murphy), David Gyasi (Romilly), John Lithgow (Donald), Topher Grace (Getty), Ellen Burstyn (old Murphy)

Jingoistic homespun set in space, Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar feels very loosey-goosey in its pseudo-intellectual way, propounding the universal truths as it does, while at the same time immersing itself in nativist and isolationist sympathies. It’s an unrestrained celebration of America’s expansionist policies, exalting the idea of manifest destiny by extending Western civilization’s never-ceasing spread. This time, we’re exhorted to push upwards, into the stars, in order to open up virgin territory ripe for the plucking to a whole new space age of exploration. Once depletion of this planet’s resources is complete, we set out for new lands and new civilizations to conquer, stripping their resources and raping the environment anew. Apparently it’s open season for colonization when the focus is outside the current ecosphere.

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The Rocky Horror Picture Show

rockyhorrorpictureshow20th Century-Fox (1975) 98 min. R

Director: Jim Sharman

Screenplay: Richard O’Brien & Jim Sharman based on The Rocky Horror Show by Richard O’Brien

Cinematography: Peter Suschitzky; Editing: Graeme Clifford 

Art Direction: Terry Ackland-Snow

Costumes: Sue Blane; Score: Richard Hartley & Richard O’Brien

Stars: Tim Curry (Frank-N-Furter), Susan Sarandon (Janet Weiss), Barry Bostwick (Brad Majors), Richard O’Brien (Riff Raff), Patricia Quinn (Magenta), Nell Campbell (Columbia), Jonathan Adams (Dr. Everett Scott), Peter Hinwood (Rocky Horror), Meat Loaf (Eddie), Charles Gray (The Criminologist)

The quintessential cult film, rather than wearing thin its welcome The Rocky Horror Picture Show gets better with age. It’s the rare movie to actually improve with repeated viewings. As its generations of fans have discovered over the decades, familiarity with this one just breeds affection. Dismissed as a box-office bomb when released, its devoted cultists have turned Rocky Horror into the longest consecutively running film in history. What Danny Peary described in his Cult Movies as ’70s “cinema’s single greatest phenomenon outside of Star Wars,” Rocky Horror may in fact be, alongside Saturday Night Feverthe defining musical of its era. Certainly none better captured the fleeting zeitgeist of the Me Generation.

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